Author Topic: 12 yo knocks Angry Birds off top spot in Mac App Store  (Read 5274 times)

Offline okee

  • Dr. Type
  • ****
  • Posts: 324
    • View Profile
I was listening to the radio this morning and heard an interview
with a 12 year old who's become the youngest mac app developer
for a half hour he knocked Angry Birds off the top spot in the Mac App Store
with his game Pizzabot.
The game looks like a Space Invaders type game and the graphics are basic
but good luck to him, here's hope for us all  :)

http://www.gamezone.com/news/pizzabot-dethrones-angry-birds-claims-top-spot-on-app-store
Android: Samsung Galaxy S2 -  ZTE Blade (Orange San Francisco) - Ainol Novo 7 Aurora 2
IOS: 2 x Ipod Touch (1G)

Offline matchy

  • Prof. Inline
  • *****
  • Posts: 1540
    • View Profile
This title says is all in these recent media reports:

"Appy kids making big bucks"
http://www.theage.com.au/digital-life/smartphone-apps/appy-kids-making-big-bucks-20111116-1nj3u.html

"TEDxManhattanBeach - Thomas Suarez - iPhone Application Developer... and 6th Grader "
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ehDAP1OQ9Zw

Offline erico

  • Community Developer
  • Prof. Inline
  • ******
  • Posts: 4160
    • View Profile
    • Portfolio
this sound too ´marketing´ for me... ;)

Offline erico

  • Community Developer
  • Prof. Inline
  • ******
  • Posts: 4160
    • View Profile
    • Portfolio
I doubt a 12 year old can manage the full coding and testing and submitting and certifying and bla bla.
This is pure marketing for me, and a low one. Kids should never be used that way.

Hat on a Stick... being born on the 70s give you the full experience on whatever ´coding´means, you are on the perfect/best era to be.
You experience the born of everything that makes the digital world what it is today.
No area of human work lives without computers, farming maybe? But you still need a comp for accounts, analysis and so on.

Can a 12 years old kid manage code and a game? of course, even younger, but not on these scales.

There, I´ve said it! :rant:

Please prove me wrong. :|



Offline Hatonastick

  • Dr. Type
  • ****
  • Posts: 474
  • Amstrad CPC 6128
    • View Profile
If I was 12 again, I bet I could prove you wrong.  =D

Just kidding.  I agree, I think it's pure marketing too.  I just need to pull my finger out and get something I can put on the store done, instead of mucking about with various tests and examples that I've been working on.  Then I'll feel better about my situation I think -- wont matter to me whether I do well or not with my first few applications, it's more about breaking my cycle of procrastination and leaving projects once I work out how to do it all.  ::)
Mat. 5: 14 - 16

Android: Toshiba Thrive Tablet (3.2), Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 (4.1.2).
Netbook: Samsung N150+ Netbook (Win 7 32-bit + Ubuntu 11.10).
Desktop: Intel i5 Desktop with NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460 (Win 8.1 64-bit).

Offline erico

  • Community Developer
  • Prof. Inline
  • ******
  • Posts: 4160
    • View Profile
    • Portfolio
If it helps, I´m on the same boat, am trying hard to do exactly what you said and also help as many friends around here as I can.
I´m not perfect, I fail, but there is where I learn, and learning is the thing!

If I was 12 again, I guess I could prove myself wrong too hehe ;)

Offline Kitty Hello

  • code monkey
  • Administrator
  • Prof. Inline
  • *******
  • Posts: 10675
  • here on my island the sea says 'hello'
    • View Profile
    • http://www.glbasic.com
I started coding with 12 and had lots of problems with simple math. OK, todays tools are better and maybe he has a dad that can help, which none of us had.

Offline Qube

  • Mr. Polyvector
  • ***
  • Posts: 157
    • View Profile
I started coding at 10 and at 12 years old I was doing very simple games but nothing fully complete. If I were 12 now I seriously doubt I would be able to package up a game, do all the XCode Certs and get it on the Mac Store. I assume his Mum/Dad obviously paid the Mac Store Dev license fee and I'd be interested to know exactly how much the kid actually did himself.

If a 12 year old has done all this (or most of it), then absolutely fantastic and hats off to him/her, seriously :good:

Offline Ian Price

  • Administrator
  • Prof. Inline
  • *******
  • Posts: 4139
  • On the shoulders of giants.
    • View Profile
    • My Apps
Seriously, how many 12 years old have the patience to deal with all the $#!+ that Apple chucks at it's developers? No way did he do everything to get that game created and upped to the App Store. I was 13 when I created my first full game, however I never had a computer before then. Kids that grow up with computers, do start learning about them from a very early age.

But nevertheless, good luck to him and I hope he has a bright career ahead of him.
I came. I saw. I played.

Offline Dabz

  • Mr. Polyvector
  • ***
  • Posts: 104
    • View Profile
    • BambooCoder
I started flicking through my Amstrad CPC manual when I was 9, made my first game when I was 10, simple little maze came, that used ink testing for collisions (TEST or TESTR, cannot remember now), continued using that method, along with creating graphics using SYMBOL, from there, started using Sean McManus's sprite tools as well as mixing machine code with Locomotive BASIC...

All gleaned from Amstrad Action, and the benefit of running my own PD library! :D

Glory years IMO! :)

Dabz

Offline Ian Price

  • Administrator
  • Prof. Inline
  • *******
  • Posts: 4139
  • On the shoulders of giants.
    • View Profile
    • My Apps
I started flicking through my Amstrad CPC manual when I was 9, made my first game when I was 10, simple little maze came, that used ink testing for collisions (TEST or TESTR, cannot remember now), continued using that method, along with creating graphics using SYMBOL, from there, started using Sean McManus's sprite tools as well as mixing machine code with Locomotive BASIC...

All gleaned from Amstrad Action, and the benefit of running my own PD library! :D

Glory years IMO! :)

Dabz
That was me too (but I was 13 when the CPC came out (1984)). Except for the age and PD library, you could well have been me!

To know the CPC is to love the CPC forever =D
I came. I saw. I played.

Offline fuzzy70

  • Community Developer
  • Prof. Inline
  • ******
  • Posts: 828
  • Look left, Look right, LOOK OUT!!
    • View Profile
My 1st use of a computer was when I was 8 on a Apple II my uncle had & he's the one to blame for getting me into computers  :D.

I had to wait 2 years till I got my own computer & that was a ZX80 kit, which I built myself under the supervision of my uncle & after him giving me soldering lessons. Thanks to the dizzy highs of 1k of ram my usage of basic did not last long & I had used machine code on the Apple II (my uncle has a lot to answer for) so that was the obvious step on the ZX80. I must admit the memories of writing Z80 mnemonics down on paper & hand assembling them are not my most pleasant childhood ones lol.

Back then info was scarce & what was available as in books & such was expensive (more than I got in pocket money anyway). Today there are so many tools available & thanks to the internet more info then you could ever want that it is no surprise seeing the above story, especially as kids are surrounded by technology at ages way younger than most of us was.

Lee
"Why don't you just make ten louder and make ten be the top number and make that a little louder?"
- "These go to eleven."

This Is Spinal Tap (1984)

Offline Hatonastick

  • Dr. Type
  • ****
  • Posts: 474
  • Amstrad CPC 6128
    • View Profile
I started flicking through my Amstrad CPC manual when I was 9, made my first game when I was 10, simple little maze came, that used ink testing for collisions (TEST or TESTR, cannot remember now), continued using that method, along with creating graphics using SYMBOL, from there, started using Sean McManus's sprite tools as well as mixing machine code with Locomotive BASIC...

All gleaned from Amstrad Action, and the benefit of running my own PD library! :D

Glory years IMO! :)

Dabz
That was me too (but I was 13 when the CPC came out (1984)). Except for the age and PD library, you could well have been me!

To know the CPC is to love the CPC forever =D
And me.  Man, the CPC was fun to program and I _loved_ the manual.  Maybe it's nostalgia but I don't think I've ever seen as well a put together manual since.
Mat. 5: 14 - 16

Android: Toshiba Thrive Tablet (3.2), Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 (4.1.2).
Netbook: Samsung N150+ Netbook (Win 7 32-bit + Ubuntu 11.10).
Desktop: Intel i5 Desktop with NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460 (Win 8.1 64-bit).

Offline matchy

  • Prof. Inline
  • *****
  • Posts: 1540
    • View Profile
Back then, a real teenage programmer achieved international fame by submitting game code to a programmers' magazine for $25.

Offline erico

  • Community Developer
  • Prof. Inline
  • ******
  • Posts: 4160
    • View Profile
    • Portfolio
The subject, if historic analyzed, is really interesting.

Nowadays we have all sorts of possibilities and parents with more knowledge on it.
But more tech gets kids interest away too. You expect kids to be subject to games really early.
Less time for everything else.

PS:. reason to say so is that today, while shopping for a friend´s daughter first anniversary, I saw a rocket made of wood and natural paint, full of so much constructive material, elements, wheels, gravity elevators... and also a dozen characters, cargo,etc had top notch retro design, 500$ was the price :O
Such a wonderful gift for a boy, but I knew if he was about older then 5, he would not bother it but video games right? Cracked my mind, if I had the cash I would buy it for myself ;)